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oupacademic:

Chronologically, the first wave began with three initial complaints at the very end of February 1692, all involving residents of Salem Village. the number of accusations slowly increased, adding only four more victims throughout the month of March, making a total of seven accusation for the one-month period beginning a the end of February. But the outbreak escalated in April, with twenty-three new cases, and in May, with an additional thirty-nine charges. By the end of May, sixty-nine accused witches had been named and, likely, examined and jailed for further legal consideration.

Find out more in “The Long and Short of Salem Witchcraft” from the Journal of Social History

Image: ”Witch Hill” or “The Salem Martyr” by Thomas Slatterwhite Noble, 1869. Collection of the New York Historical Society. CC-BY-3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

fashionsfromhistory:

Robe Volante
c.1730
Europe

The robe volante, or flowing robe, featured by Watteau at the center of his painting L’Enseigne de Gersaint of 1721, gave freedom and movement to the new fashion. In fact, it was not the style of gown that was new, but the use to which it was put. Worn over the boned bodice and petticoat, it had previously been worn only informally, in the privacy of the boudoir or bedroom, although its unwaisted shape sometimes made it the choice of pregnant women to disguise their condition (this, at any rate, was how it was worn by Madame de Montespan, whose little ruse fooled nobody: as soon as she appeared in the gown, the whole court realised immediately the nature of the happy event in prospect for the king’s favorite mistress).
     -Dress in France in the Eighteenth Century by Madeleine Delpierre

MFA
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fashionsfromhistory:

Robe Volante

c.1730

Europe

The robe volante, or flowing robe, featured by Watteau at the center of his painting L’Enseigne de Gersaint of 1721, gave freedom and movement to the new fashion. In fact, it was not the style of gown that was new, but the use to which it was put. Worn over the boned bodice and petticoat, it had previously been worn only informally, in the privacy of the boudoir or bedroom, although its unwaisted shape sometimes made it the choice of pregnant women to disguise their condition (this, at any rate, was how it was worn by Madame de Montespan, whose little ruse fooled nobody: as soon as she appeared in the gown, the whole court realised immediately the nature of the happy event in prospect for the king’s favorite mistress).

     -Dress in France in the Eighteenth Century by Madeleine Delpierre

MFA

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